The Green Ribbon (work-in-progress)   This project explores the interplay between human activity and wildlife along the European Green Belt, and how nature has reclaimed the land during and since the Cold War era.  Following on from work I made in Poland and Germany in 2013, I sought the next part of the story in terms of the modern history of the land.  The European Green Belt is an area of land that spans the breadth of Europe from the Barents Sea in the Arctic Circle to the Black and Adriatic Seas in the south. It traces the boundary of the former Iron Curtain, which for nearly five decades was an out-of-bounds no-man’s land dividing east from west. This corridor, in war time a death trap to humans, paradoxically enabled wildlife to flourish. Today much of the route is connected through national parks, biospheres and nature reserves.  The project has been supported by the Environmental Bursary from The Royal Photographic Society and The Photographic Angle. Part of this work was made in collaboration with Carl Bigmore, and this work can be see in The RPS Journal  here.
       
     
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  The Green Ribbon (work-in-progress)   This project explores the interplay between human activity and wildlife along the European Green Belt, and how nature has reclaimed the land during and since the Cold War era.  Following on from work I made in Poland and Germany in 2013, I sought the next part of the story in terms of the modern history of the land.  The European Green Belt is an area of land that spans the breadth of Europe from the Barents Sea in the Arctic Circle to the Black and Adriatic Seas in the south. It traces the boundary of the former Iron Curtain, which for nearly five decades was an out-of-bounds no-man’s land dividing east from west. This corridor, in war time a death trap to humans, paradoxically enabled wildlife to flourish. Today much of the route is connected through national parks, biospheres and nature reserves.  The project has been supported by the Environmental Bursary from The Royal Photographic Society and The Photographic Angle. Part of this work was made in collaboration with Carl Bigmore, and this work can be see in The RPS Journal  here.
       
     

The Green Ribbon (work-in-progress)

This project explores the interplay between human activity and wildlife along the European Green Belt, and how nature has reclaimed the land during and since the Cold War era.

Following on from work I made in Poland and Germany in 2013, I sought the next part of the story in terms of the modern history of the land.

The European Green Belt is an area of land that spans the breadth of Europe from the Barents Sea in the Arctic Circle to the Black and Adriatic Seas in the south. It traces the boundary of the former Iron Curtain, which for nearly five decades was an out-of-bounds no-man’s land dividing east from west. This corridor, in war time a death trap to humans, paradoxically enabled wildlife to flourish. Today much of the route is connected through national parks, biospheres and nature reserves.

The project has been supported by the Environmental Bursary from The Royal Photographic Society and The Photographic Angle. Part of this work was made in collaboration with Carl Bigmore, and this work can be see in The RPS Journal here.

HKJ_EGB_01_02.jpg
       
     
HKJ_EGB_11_04.jpg
       
     
07_Copy of HKJ_EGB_19_03.jpg
       
     
11_Copy of HKJ_EGB_25_08.jpg
       
     
03_Copy of HKJ_EGB_01_07.jpg
       
     
12_Copy of HKJ_EGB_26_07.jpg
       
     
14_Copy of HKJ_EGB_26_10.jpg
       
     
15_Copy of HKJ_EGB_31_05.jpg
       
     
19_Copy of HKJ_EGB_28_01.jpg
       
     
26_Copy of HKJ_EGB_32_02.jpg
       
     
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29_Copy of HKJ_EGB_37_03.jpg
       
     
30_Copy of HKJ_EGB_37_10.jpg
       
     
33_Copy of HKJ_EGB_39_02.jpg
       
     
34_Copy of HKJ_EGB_40_10.jpg
       
     
40_Copy of HKJ_EGB_44_08.jpg
       
     
41_Copy of HKJ_EGB_48_01.jpg
       
     
42_Copy of HKJ_EGB_45_03.jpg
       
     
50_HKJ_EGB_55_07.jpg
       
     
HKJZ_EGB_littleedit_023.jpg
       
     
53_HKJ_EGB_58_07.jpg
       
     
61_Copy of HKJ_EGB_75_01.jpg
       
     
62_Copy of HKJ_EGB_76_02.jpg
       
     
63_Copy of HKJ_EGB_78_03.jpg